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Author Topic: Gun transfer after death  (Read 693 times)

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Online 1911vm

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Gun transfer after death
« on: March 10, 2018, 05:50:13 PM »

So I totally  get that this is a bit morbid question, but I need to ask it.  I know some one who has cancer.  It's in remission at the moment but who knows what future has in mind. So he asked me if something happens to him can his thing be transferred to his son. I did not know what to say. Any help would be great thanks.



Online Will1776

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Re: Gun transfer after death
« Reply #1 on: March 10, 2018, 06:49:25 PM »
Someone correct me if I’m wrong but I believe transfer requirements are exempt for inheriting firearms. Not sure what the laws are if it’s an “assault weapon” or NFA.

Online 1911vm

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Re: Gun transfer after death
« Reply #2 on: March 10, 2018, 07:21:42 PM »
I guess the AW is the big question. 

Online BerettaBoy213

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Re: Gun transfer after death
« Reply #3 on: March 10, 2018, 08:40:55 PM »
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I guess the AW is the big question.

Is it an AW on the banned-by-name list?

Offline Jgreen2193

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Re: Gun transfer after death
« Reply #4 on: March 10, 2018, 08:45:29 PM »
I believe AW’s and declared LCM’s can be willed over.

Maybe sb will be around to clarify. But I’m sure it is in the law somewhere.

Offline nutter

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Re: Gun transfer after death
« Reply #5 on: March 10, 2018, 08:52:28 PM »
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I believe AW’s and declared LCM’s can be willed over.

Maybe sb will be around to clarify. But I’m sure it is in the law somewhere.
They can be willed over

Offline nutter

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Re: Gun transfer after death
« Reply #6 on: March 10, 2018, 08:55:40 PM »
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Someone correct me if I’m wrong but I believe transfer requirements are exempt for inheriting firearms. Not sure what the laws are if it’s an “assault weapon” or NFA.

Transfer requirements - both state and federal still apply. There is a federal transfer form for NFA and the state still wants regular firearms transferred lawfully. Aw's can be willed to a person but they would still have to be transferred legally


Edit to add- if you have inherited firearms like pistols and they were not "officially" transferred (after death) I doubt you would be prosecuted or are in any legal danger- but- if the firearms are ever taken by the police for some reason and you are not the legal owner (with transfer paperwork) you will not be getting those firearms back .
« Last Edit: March 11, 2018, 10:25:25 AM by nutter »

Online sbhaven

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Re: Gun transfer after death
« Reply #7 on: March 11, 2018, 12:17:54 PM »
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So I totally  get that this is a bit morbid question, but I need to ask it.  I know some one who has cancer.  It's in remission at the moment but who knows what future has in mind. So he asked me if something happens to him can his thing be transferred to his son. I did not know what to say. Any help would be great thanks.
First and foremost tell them to specifically write it into their will where the firearms are supposed to go. Do not leave that kind of stuff out of the will since it often leads to angry/ugly family disagreements come time to settle the dead person's effects.

Things get kind of hazy and murky when it comes to deceased persons and their firearms. It gets even more confusing if that person is in another state. Can one drive to the other state and pickup the long guns/handguns or does it have to go through an FFL kind of thing. Never got a streight solid answer on that particular issue.

If both the deceased and the person receiving the firearms are within the state of CT then obviously one cannot be prohibited from possessing firearms. And technically they'll need one of the relevant permits/certificates to take legal possession of the firearm from the executor of the estate/will. Of course others will suggest, just go pick it up and don't tell anyone else.

The You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login has several entries dealing with these questions with respect to post ban registered AW's and LCM's.

Can I transfer a so called "assault weapon" upon my death?
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Can I transfer a so called "large capacity magazine" upon my death?
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Bottom line for post ban registered AW's and LCM's is they are supposed to be registered/declared by the person who receives them from the deceised person. This in spite of the fact the stupid laws for LCM's left out the "how to register" part when it comes to dead persons LCM's.
:facepalm:
Potentially, a government is the most dangerous threat to man's rights: it holds a legal monopoly on the use of physical force against legally disarmed victims.
- Ayn Rand

Offline nutter

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Re: Gun transfer after death
« Reply #8 on: March 11, 2018, 09:28:59 PM »
 :beer:
 :dunno:
 :banana:

Online joelcramer

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Re: Gun transfer after death
« Reply #9 on: March 12, 2018, 03:51:58 PM »
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Of course others will suggest, just go pick it up and don't tell anyone else.
This advice will get somebody in trouble depending on the date the gun was bought, the age of the person getting the guns and the date mandatory reporting came into effect.

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Re: Gun transfer after death
« Reply #10 on: March 12, 2018, 07:16:22 PM »
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This advice will get somebody in trouble depending on the date the gun was bought, the age of the person getting the guns and the date mandatory reporting came into effect.
It very well may get someone into trouble but its something I've seen others suggest elsewhere when ever a question about inherited guns and picking them up. Wouldn't shock me if it happens fairly often due to the stupid complexity and vagueness of the current state firearm laws.
Potentially, a government is the most dangerous threat to man's rights: it holds a legal monopoly on the use of physical force against legally disarmed victims.
- Ayn Rand