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CT AWB & LCM FAQ

Connecticut’s Ban of Certain Firearms, Magazines and Ammunition

General Primer on Connecticut's Ban of Certain Firearms, Magazines and Ammunition

This document, which is hosted on CTGunTalk.com, is an informational work in progress on the firearm laws of Connecticut.

This information does not constitute a legal opinion; it is presented for informational purposes only!!!

Please read the information carefully as it can be extremely confusing, convoluted and at times contradictory. If you want a legal opinion please consult a lawyer familiar in this states firearm statutes/law. This information is a general overview of the current firearm laws of this state. It is by no means 100% accurate. Where possible language from the actual statues has been incorporated.

After reading this, if you still have questions on the laws/statutes PLEASE use the CTGunTalk.com Search feature. Nine times out of ten your question has been asked before and there is discussion on it.

Remember that even though a firearm manufactured after September 13, 1994 might not meet the feature definition of being a so called "assault weapon" it may still be banned by name, so always remember to check the banned by name firearm lists.

"A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed."
- United States Bill of Rights, Amendment II

"Every citizen has a right to bear arms in defense of himself and the state."
- State of Connecticut Constitution, Article I, Section 15

Disclaimer: This information does not constitute a legal opinion; it is presented for informational purposes only. The authors, CTGunTalk.com, and any other party involved in creating, producing or delivering this document assume no liability or responsibility for any errors or omissions contained within this document. All information is provided "AS IS". The reader assumes any and all liability and responsibility when acting on the information contained within this document. The reader assumes any all liability and responsibility to understand and follow any and all applicable laws of the State of Connecticut and any and all applicable Federal laws.

 

 

Table of Contents

Assault Weapons

What is a so called "assault weapon"?

Banned By Name Firearms

Rifles

Handguns

Shotguns

All Semiautomatic Firearms

Parts

Assault Weapon does not include

Assault Weapon Definitions

The Old Law

Questions about so called "assault weapons"

Where can so called "assault weapons" be legally possessed?

How are so called "assault weapons" supposed to be transported?

What are "prebans" and who can purchase them?

Who can purchase post 9/13/94 manufactured so called "assault weapons"?

What happens when I leave one of the exempted organizations? Do I have to register my so called "assault weapon"?

I'm active duty military or in the National Guard can I buy a so called "assault weapon"?

What happens if I move into this state with a so called "assault weapon"?

What happens if I move out of this state with a so called "assault weapon"?

Can I sell a so called "assault weapon"?

Can I transfer a so called "assault weapon" upon my death?

Do I have to report the theft of a so called "assault weapon"?

Can I put a threaded barrel on a semiautomatic handgun?

Can I add additional features to a so called "assault weapon"?

Can I buy a so called "assault weapon" outside of Connecticut?

Do I have to keep the so called "assault weapon" locked up at home?

Can I transfer a so called "assault weapon" into a Trust?

Can one SBR (Short Barrel Rifle) a so called "assault weapon"?

Can I buy or create a rimfire AR-15 rifle or add features to a semiautomatic detachable magazine rimfire rifle?

Are there any AR-15 type rifles that I can buy?

Can I buy parts for a so called "assault weapon"?

I want to buy an AK-47, or some other firearm that is "banned by name", can I do so?

I didn't register my so called "assault weapon" with the state, is there anything I can do?

I have an illegal so called "assault weapon", can I modify it to make it legal?

Large Capacity Magazines

What is a so called "large capacity magazine"?

Large Capacity Magazine Definitions

Questions about so called "large capacity magazines"

Are there "preban" magazines?

Where can so called "large capacity magazines" be legally possessed and how many rounds can they be legally loaded to at those locations?

How are so called "large capacity magazines" supposed to be transported?

Who can purchase so called "large capacity magazines"?

What happens when I leave one of the exempted organizations? Do I have to declare my so called "large capacity magazines"?

I'm active duty military or in the National Guard can I buy a so called "large capacity magazine"?

What happens if I move into this state with a so called "large capacity magazine"?

What happens if I move out of this state with a so called "large capacity magazine"?

Can I sell a so called "large capacity magazine"?

Can I transfer a so called "large capacity magazine" upon my death?

Do I have to report the theft of a so called "large capacity magazine"?

Can I carry spare so called "large capacity magazines" in public?

Can I buy a so called "large capacity magazine" outside of Connecticut?

Can I "block" my so called "large capacity magazine" so it only holds 10 rounds?

I purchased a handgun after April 4, 2013 and want to carry it in public; can I carry a so called "large capacity magazine" in this handgun?

I heard that magazines cannot extend beyond the grip of the handgun, is this true?

Can I buy replacement parts for a so called "large capacity magazine"?

I didn't declare my so called "large capacity magazine" with the state, is there anything I can do?

Ammunition

What is ammunition?

Armor piercing and incendiary .50 caliber ammunition

Questions about ammunition

Who can buy ammunition?

Do I have to show a state issued permit or certificate to buy ammunition?

Can a non resident buy an ammunition in this state?

Can one buy an ammunition outside of this state or online?

Can someone give me ammunition?

Is there anyone who is exempt from the requirements to show a permit or certificate when buying an ammunition?

Who can buy or transport armor piercing or .50 caliber incendiary ammunition?

Can I buy armor piercing or .50 caliber incendiary ammunition outside of Connecticut and bring it back into the state?

Can I carry or transport a firearm loaded with armor piercing or .50 caliber incendiary ammunition?

Who is prohibited from buying or possessing ammunition?

Ammunition Magazines

What is an ammunition magazine?

Questions about ammunition magazines

Who can buy ammunition magazines?

Do I have to show a state issued permit or certificate to buy an ammunition magazine?

Can a non resident buy an ammunition magazine in this state?

Can one buy an ammunition magazine outside of this state or online?

Can someone give me an ammunition magazine?

Is there anyone who is exempt from the requirements to show a permit or certificate when buying an ammunition magazine?

Who is prohibited from buying or possessing an ammunition magazine?

Long Guns And Hand Guns

Long guns

Hand guns

Black powder firearms and antique firearms

Questions on long guns and hand guns

Can I buy a long gun or hand gun in a face to face sale with this state?

Can I buy a long gun outside of this state?

Can I buy a hand gun outside of this state?

Can I arrange to have a long gun or hand gun shipped to my local federal firearm licensee?

When buying a long gun or hand gun can it come with a large capacity magazine?

Can I carry a hand gun in public without a permit?

Do I have to show a permit or certificate to buy a black powder firearm or an antique?

Can I carry a black powder or antique pistol or revolver in public?

Can I move into Connecticut with long guns and hand guns, and do I need to obtain a permit or certificate before I move into Connecticut?

Can I drive through Connecticut with long guns or hand guns?

Are there any limitations on where or how I carry a firearm in Connecticut?

Can I carry a hand gun in a bar or other location that serves liquor?

Am I required to show my pistol permit when a police officer asks for it?

Who is prohibited from possessing firearms?

I have a valid pistol permit why cannot I carry in or on school property?

I live within 1,000 feet of a school, am I prohibited from having or possessing firearms in my home or on my property?

Are malls, sports arenas, sports stadiums, theaters and other such venues "gun free zones"?

Can I carry in a public park, state park and forest or in a national park?

Permit Information

Permit to Carry Pistol or Revolver

Non Resident Permit to Carry Pistol or Revolver

Eligibility Certificate to Purchase a Pistol or Revolver

Eligibility Certificate to Purchase Long Guns

Ammunition Certificate

Miscellaneous Information

What or who constitutes the the military or naval forces of this state for the purposes of being able to buy a so called "assault weapon" or so called "large capacity magazine"?

What do the various permits and certificates look like?

What does "copies and duplicates" mean with respect to so called "assault weapons"?

Can I buy body armor in CT?

Can I turn an 80% lower into an "AR-15"?

List of Statutes

List of DESPP Forms/Applications/Publications/Websites

List of Opinions from DESPP/OLR

Other Relevant Links

Disclaimer

 

 

Assault Weapons

What is a so called "assault weapon"?

The state of Connecticut currently (as of 12/13/2014) defines a so called "assault weapon" as follows:

Banned By Name Firearms

Any selective-fire firearm capable of fully automatic, semiautomatic or burst fire at the option of the user or any of the following specified semiautomatic firearms: Algimec Agmi; Armalite AR-180; Australian Automatic Arms SAP Pistol; Auto-Ordnance Thompson type; Avtomat Kalashnikov AK-47 type; Barrett Light-Fifty model 82A1; Beretta AR-70; Bushmaster Auto Rifle and Auto Pistol; Calico models M-900, M-950 and 100-P; Chartered Industries of Singapore SR-88; Colt AR-15 and Sporter; Daewoo K-1, K-2, Max-1 and Max-2; Encom MK-IV, MP-9 and MP-45; Fabrique Nationale FN/FAL, FN/LAR, or FN/FNC; FAMAS MAS 223; Feather AT-9 and Mini-AT; Federal XC-900 and XC-450; Franchi SPAS-12 and LAW-12; Galil AR and ARM; Goncz High-Tech Carbine and High-Tech Long Pistol; Heckler & Koch HK-91, HK-93, HK-94 and SP-89; Holmes MP-83; MAC-10, MAC-11 and MAC-11 Carbine type; Intratec TEC-9 and Scorpion; Iver Johnson Enforcer model 3000; Ruger Mini-14/5F folding stock model only; Scarab Skorpion; SIG 57 AMT and 500 series; Spectre Auto Carbine and Auto Pistol; Springfield Armory BM59, SAR-48 and G-3; Sterling MK-6 and MK-7; Steyr AUG; Street Sweeper and Striker 12 revolving cylinder shotguns; USAS-12; UZI Carbine, Mini-Carbine and Pistol; Weaver Arms Nighthawk; Wilkinson"Linda" Pistol.

 

Any of the following specified semiautomatic centerfire rifles, or copies or duplicates thereof with the capability of any such rifles, that were in production prior to or on April 4, 2013: (i) AK-47; (ii) AK-74; (iii) AKM; (iv) AKS-74U; (v) ARM; (vi) MAADI AK47; (vii) MAK90; (viii) MISR; (ix) NHM90 and NHM91; (x) Norinco 56, 56S, 84S and 86S; (xi) Poly Technologies AKS and AK47; (xii) SA 85; (xiii) SA 93; (xiv) VEPR; (xv) WASR-10; (xvi) WUM; (xvii) Rock River Arms LAR-47; (xviii) Vector Arms AK-47; (xix) AR-10; (xx) AR-15; (xxi) Bushmaster Carbon 15, Bushmaster XM15, Bushmaster ACR Rifles, Bushmaster MOE Rifles; (xxii) Colt Match Target Rifles; (xxiii) Armalite M15; (xxiv) Olympic Arms AR-15, A1, CAR, PCR, K3B, K30R, K16, K48, K8 and K9 Rifles; (xxv) DPMS Tactical Rifles; (xxvi) Smith and Wesson M&P15 Rifles; (xxvii) Rock River Arms LAR-15; (xxviii) Doublestar AR Rifles; (xxix) Barrett REC7; (xxx) Beretta Storm; (xxxi) Calico Liberty 50, 50 Tactical, 100, 100 Tactical, I, I Tactical, II and II Tactical Rifles; (xxxii) Hi-Point Carbine Rifles; (xxxiii) HK-PSG-1; (xxxiv) Kel-Tec Sub-2000, SU Rifles, and RFB; (xxxv) Remington Tactical Rifle Model 7615; (xxxvi) SAR-8, SAR-4800 and SR9; (xxxvii) SLG 95; (xxxviii) SLR 95 or 96; (xxxix) TNW M230 and M2HB; (xl) Vector Arms UZI; (xli) Galil and Galil Sporter; (xlii) Daewoo AR 100 and AR 110C; (xliii) Fabrique Nationale/FN 308 Match and L1A1 Sporter; (xliv) HK USC; (xlv) IZHMASH Saiga AK; (xlvi) SIG Sauer 551-A1, 556, 516, 716 and M400 Rifles; (xlvii) Valmet M62S, M71S and M78S; (xlviii) Wilkinson Arms Linda Carbine; and (xlix) Barrett M107A1.

 

Any of the following specified semiautomatic pistols, or copies or duplicates thereof with the capability of any such pistols, that were in production prior to or on April 4, 2013: (i) Centurion 39 AK; (ii) Draco AK-47; (iii) HCR AK-47; (iv) IO Inc. Hellpup AK-47; (v) Mini-Draco AK-47; (vi) Yugo Krebs Krink; (vii) American Spirit AR-15; (viii) Bushmaster Carbon 15; (ix) Doublestar Corporation AR; (x) DPMS AR-15; (xi) Olympic Arms AR-15; (xii) Rock River Arms LAR 15; (xiii) Calico Liberty III and III Tactical Pistols; (xiv) Masterpiece Arms MPA Pistols and Velocity Arms VMA Pistols; (xv) Intratec TEC-DC9 and AB-10; (xvi) Colefire Magnum; (xvii) German Sport 522 PK and Chiappa Firearms Mfour-22; (xviii) DSA SA58 PKP FAL; (xix) I.O. Inc. PPS-43C; (xx) Kel-Tec PLR-16 Pistol; (xxi) Sig Sauer P516 and P556 Pistols; and (xxii) Thompson TA5 Pistols.

 

Any of the following semiautomatic shotguns, or copies or duplicates thereof with the capability of any such shotguns, that were in production prior to or on April 4, 2013: All IZHMASH Saiga 12 Shotguns.

Rifles

A semiautomatic, centerfire rifle manufactured after September 13, 1994 that has an ability to accept a detachable magazine and has at least one of the following:

  1. A folding or telescoping stock
  2. Any grip of the weapon, including a pistol grip, a thumbhole stock, or any other stock, the use of which would allow an individual to grip the weapon, resulting in any finger on the trigger hand in addition to the trigger finger being directly below any portion of the action of the weapon when firing
  3. A forward pistol grip
  4. A flash suppressor
  5. A grenade launcher or flare launcher

A semiautomatic, centerfire rifle that has a fixed magazine with the ability to accept more than ten rounds.

A semiautomatic, centerfire rifle that has an overall length of less than thirty inches.

Handguns

A semiautomatic pistol that has an ability to accept a detachable magazine and has at least one of the following:

  1. An ability to accept a detachable ammunition magazine that attaches at some location outside of the pistol grip
  2. A threaded barrel capable of accepting a flash suppressor, forward pistol grip or silencer
  3. A shroud that is attached to, or partially or completely encircles, the barrel and that permits the shooter to fire the firearm without being burned, except a slide that encloses the barrel
  4. A second hand grip
  5. A semiautomatic pistol with a fixed magazine that has the ability to accept more than ten rounds

Shotguns

A semiautomatic shotgun that has both of the following:

  1. A folding or telescoping stock; and
  2. Any grip of the weapon, including a pistol grip, a thumbhole stock, or any other stock, the use of which would allow an individual to grip the weapon, resulting in any finger on the trigger hand in addition to the trigger finger being directly below any portion of the action of the weapon when firing

A semiautomatic shotgun that has the ability to accept a detachable magazine

A shotgun with a revolving cylinder

All Semiautomatic Firearms

Any semiautomatic firearm that meets the so called "assault weapon" criteria prior to January 1, 2013. See: The Old Law.

Parts

A part or combination of parts designed or intended to convert a firearm into an assault weapon, as defined above, or any combination of parts from which an assault weapon, as defined above, may be assembled if those parts are in the possession or under the control of the same person.

Assault Weapon does not include

  1. Any firearm modified to render it permanently inoperable, or
  2. A part or any combination of parts of an assault weapon, that are not assembled as an assault weapon, when in the possession of a licensed gun dealer, or a gunsmith who is in the licensed gun dealers employ, for the purposes of servicing or repairing lawfully possessed assault weapons.

 

 

 

Assault Weapon Definitions

"Action of the weapon" - The part of the firearm that loads, fires and ejects a cartridge, which part includes, but is not limited to, the upper and lower receiver, charging handle, forward assist, magazine release and shell deflector.

"Detachable magazine" - An ammunition feeding device that can be removed without disassembling the firearm action.

"Firearm" - Any sawed-off shotgun, machine gun, rifle, shotgun, pistol, revolver or other weapon, whether loaded or unloaded from which a shot may be discharged.

"Forward pistol grip" - Any feature capable of functioning as a grip that can be held by the nontrigger hand.

"Lawfully possesses" - With respect to an assault weapon described above.

  1. Actual possession that is lawful under sections 53-202b to 53-202k.
  2. Constructive possession pursuant to a lawful purchase transacted prior to or on April 4, 2013, regardless of whether the assault weapon was delivered to the purchaser prior to or on April 4, 2013, which lawful purchase is evidenced by a writing sufficient to indicate that:
    1. A contract for sale was made between the parties prior to or on April 4, 2013, for the purchase of the assault weapon
    2. Full or partial payment for the assault weapon was made by the purchaser to the seller of the assault weapon prior to or on April 4, 2013
  3. Actual possession or constructive possession, as evidenced by a written statement made under penalty of false statement on such form as the Commissioner of Emergency Services and Public Protection prescribes.

    Note: In order to obtain a Certificate of Possession for a so called "assault weapon" with the state one has to prove they had "lawful possession" of it.

"Pistol grip" - Means a grip or similar feature that can function as a grip for the trigger hand.

"Second hand grip" - Means a grip or similar feature that can function as a grip that is additional to the trigger hand grip.

"Preban" - Preban is what many firearm owners call a firearm manufactured PRIOR to September 13, 1994 which meets the state's definition of a so called "assault weapon" under the statutes as they were on January 1, 2013. Prebans are exempt from the so called "assault weapon" registration requirements (Certificate of Possession), and can be legally bought, sold, or transferred. Note: There is disagreement by some who believe the "preban" firearm had to be a so called "assault weapon" prior to 9/13/94. Others believe that it doesn't matter when the "preban" firearm became a so called "assault weapon", all that matters is that the "preban" firearm was manufactured prior to 9/13/94.

"Certificate of Possession" - A document one receives after registering their so called"assault weapon" with the state.

 

 

 

The Old Law

Any selective-fire firearm capable of fully automatic, semiautomatic or burst fire at the option of the user or any of the following specified semiautomatic firearms: Algimec Agmi; Armalite AR-180; Australian Automatic Arms SAP Pistol; Auto-Ordnance Thompson type; Avtomat Kalashnikov AK-47 type; Barrett Light-Fifty model 82A1; Beretta AR-70; Bushmaster Auto Rifle and Auto Pistol; Calico models M-900, M-950 and 100-P; Chartered Industries of Singapore SR-88; Colt AR-15 and Sporter; Daewoo K-1, K-2, Max-1 and Max-2; Encom MK-IV, MP-9 and MP-45; Fabrique Nationale FN/FAL, FN/LAR, or FN/FNC; FAMAS MAS 223; Feather AT-9 and Mini-AT; Federal XC-900 and XC-450; Franchi SPAS-12 and LAW-12; Galil AR and ARM; Goncz High-Tech Carbine and High-Tech Long Pistol; Heckler & Koch HK-91, HK-93, HK-94 and SP-89; Holmes MP-83; MAC-10, MAC-11 and MAC-11 Carbine type; Intratec TEC-9 and Scorpion; Iver Johnson Enforcer model 3000; Ruger Mini-14/5F folding stock model only; Scarab Skorpion; SIG 57 AMT and 500 series; Spectre Auto Carbine and Auto Pistol; Springfield Armory BM59, SAR-48 and G-3; Sterling MK-6 and MK-7; Steyr AUG; Street Sweeper and Striker 12 revolving cylinder shotguns; USAS-12; UZI Carbine, Mini-Carbine and Pistol; Weaver Arms Nighthawk; Wilkinson "Linda" Pistol.

A semiautomatic rifle that has an ability to accept a detachable magazine and has at least two of the following:

  1. A folding or telescoping stock
  2. A pistol grip that protrudes conspicuously beneath the action of the weapon
  3. A bayonet mount
  4. A flash suppressor or threaded barrel designed to accommodate a flash suppressor
  5. A grenade launcher

A semiautomatic pistol that has an ability to accept a detachable magazine and has at least two of the following:

  1. An ammunition magazine that attaches to the pistol outside of the pistol grip
  2. A threaded barrel capable of accepting a barrel extender, flash suppressor, forward handgrip or silencer
  3. A shroud that is attached to, or partially or completely encircles, the barrel and that permits the shooter to hold the firearm with the nontrigger hand without being burned
  4. A manufactured weight of fifty ounces or more when the pistol is unloaded
  5. A semiautomatic version of an automatic firearm

A semiautomatic shotgun that has at least two of the following:

  1. A folding or telescoping stock
  2. A pistol grip that protrudes conspicuously beneath the action of the weapon
  3. A fixed magazine capacity in excess of five rounds
  4. An ability to accept a detachable magazine

 

 

 

Questions about so called "assault weapons":

Where can so called "assault weapons" be legally possessed?

Any person who has been issued a certificate of possession for an assault weapon under this section may possess the assault weapon only under the following conditions:

  1. At that person's residence, place of business or other property owned by that person, or on property owned by another person with the owner's express permission
  2. While on the premises of a target range of a public or private club or organization organized for the purpose of practicing shooting at targets
  3. While on a target range which holds a regulatory or business license for the purpose of practicing shooting at that target range
  4. While on the premises of a licensed shooting club
  5. While attending any exhibition, display or educational project which is about firearms and which is sponsored by, conducted under the auspices of, or approved by a law enforcement agency or a nationally or state recognized entity that fosters proficiency in, or promotes education about, firearms
  6. While transporting the assault weapon between any of the places set forth in this subsection, or to any licensed gun dealer for servicing or repair, provided the assault weapon is transported as required by section 53-202f
  7. With respect to a nonresident of this state, while transporting a semiautomatic pistol that is defined as an assault weapon that the Commissioner of Emergency Services and Public Protection designates as being designed expressly for use in target shooting events at the Olympic games sponsored by the International Olympic Committee, into or through this state in order to attend any exhibition, display or educational project, or to participate in a collegiate, Olympic or target pistol shooting competition in this state which is sponsored by, conducted under the auspices of, or approved by a law enforcement agency or a nationally or state recognized entity that fosters proficiency in, or promotes education about, firearms, provided:
    1. Such pistol is transported into or through this state not more than forty-eight hours prior to or after such exhibition, display, project or competition
    2. Such pistol is unloaded and carried in a locked carrying case and the ammunition for such pistol is carried in a separate locked container
    3. Such nonresident has not been convicted of a felony in this state or of an offense in another state that would constitute a felony if committed in this state
    4. Such nonresident has in his or her possession a pistol permit or firearms registration card if such permit or card is required for possession of such pistol under the laws of his or her state of residence.

How are so called "assault weapons" supposed to be transported?

While transporting an assault weapon between any of the places set forth in the prior section, no person shall carry a loaded assault weapon concealed from public view or knowingly have, in any motor vehicle owned, operated or occupied by such person:

  1. A loaded assault weapon
  2. An unloaded assault weapon unless such weapon is kept in the trunk of such vehicle or in a case or other container which is inaccessible to the operator of such vehicle or any passenger in such vehicle.

These transport requirements shall not apply to a member, inspector, officer or constable that possesses an assault weapon.

What are "prebans" and who can purchase them?

"Prebans" are generally considered to be any firearm manufactured prior to September 13, 1994. A "preban" firearm is not limited by the feature count limit or any other restriction with respect to so called "assault weapons". A "preban" firearm is not restricted or banned from; sale, purchase, possession or transfer. A "preban" firearm does not need to be registered as a so called "assault weapon" (Certificate of Possession) with the state.

Anyone who can purchase firearms can purchase a "preban" firearm.

Because "prebans" are still considered so called "assault weapons" they are supposed to be transported in the same manor as so called "assault weapons".

Note: There is disagreement by some who believe the "preban" firearm had to be a so called "assault weapon" prior to 9/13/94. Others believe that it doesn't matter when the "preban" firearm became a so called "assault weapon", all that matters is that the "preban" firearm was manufactured prior to 9/13/94.

Currently, DESPP has reinterpreted the "preban" statute (Sec. 53-202m) governing firearm manufactured prior to September 13, 1994. See this PDF. This reinterpretation indicates firearms that were once specifically banned by name, such as the "AK-47 Type", can now be; sold, purchased, transferred, and possessed provided they were manufactured prior to September 13, 1994.

Note: If modifying a"preban" into an NFA firearm, such as a short barrel rifle (SBR), one may have to apply to DESPP for a "Certificate of Possession". ATF is currently (as of 12/13/2014) requiring NFA applicants who are creating an SBR from a "preban" firearm to include a "Certificate of Possession" for the firearm with their application. One may also need to prove to DESPP the date of "preban" firearm manufacture via a letter from the firearm manufacturer indicating the firearm was manufactured prior to September 13, 1994.

Who can purchase post 9/13/94 manufactured so called "assault weapons"?

Members of the following organizations can purchase post 9/14/94 manufactured so called "assault weapons":

  1. The Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection, police departments, the Department of Correction, the Division of Criminal Justice, the Department of Motor Vehicles, the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection or the military or naval forces of this state or of the United States.
  2. A sworn and duly certified member of an organized police department, the Division of State Police within the Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection or the Department of Correction, a chief inspector or inspector in the Division of Criminal Justice, a salaried inspector of motor vehicles designated by the Commissioner of Motor Vehicles, a conservation officer or special conservation officer appointed by the Commissioner of Energy and Environmental Protection pursuant to section 26-5, or a constable who is certified by the Police Officer Standards and Training Council and appointed by the chief executive authority of a town, city or borough to perform criminal law enforcement duties, pursuant to a letter on the letterhead of such department, division, commissioner or authority authorizing the purchase and stating that the sworn member, inspector, officer or constable will use the assault weapon in the discharge of official duties, and that a records check indicates that the sworn member, inspector, officer or constable has not been convicted of a crime of family violence, for use by such sworn member, inspector, officer or constable in the discharge of such sworn member's, inspector's, officer's or constable's official duties or when off duty.
  3. A member of the military or naval forces of this state or of the United States.
  4. A nuclear facility licensed by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission for the purpose of providing security services at such facility, or any contractor or subcontractor of such facility for the purpose of providing security services at such facility.

What happens when I leave one of the exempted organizations? Do I have to register my so called "assault weapon"?

Yes. Anyone who retires or is otherwise separated from service from any of the exempted organizations shall apply within ninety days of such retirement or separation from service to the Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection for a certificate of possession with respect to such assault weapon.

I'm active duty military or in the National Guard can I buy a so called "assault weapon"?

See the questions related to who can purchase so called"assault weapons", and questions related to "exempted organizations" to see if you are exempted from the bans on purchasing so called "assault weapons".

What happens if I move into this state with a so called "assault weapon"?

Any person who moves into the state in lawful possession of an assault weapon, shall, within ninety days, either render the assault weapon permanently inoperable, sell the assault weapon to a licensed gun dealer or remove the assault weapon from this state, except that any person who is a member of the military or naval forces of this state or of the United States, is in lawful possession of an assault weapon and has been transferred into the state after October 1, 1994, may, within ninety days of arriving in the state, apply to the Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection for a certificate of possession with respect to such assault weapon. Note: The general consensus is that one is allowed to bring in "preban" firearms that are considered so called "assault weapons" and one does not have to report them to DESPP.

What happens if I move out of this state with a so called"assault weapon"?

The law does not appear to deal with moving out of this state with so called "assault weapons". There does not appear to be a requirement to notify the state of your new address so they can update the Certificate of Possession.

Can I sell a so called "assault weapon"?

Yes. Any "preban" firearm can be sold to anyone who can legally buy firearms. However, post 9/13/94 manufactured so called "assault weapons" can only be sold to a licensed gun dealer. Or they can be sold through a licensed gun dealer to a person in one of the exempted organizations. One can also sell their so called "assault weapon" to someone outside of this state in accordance with federal laws and the laws of the buyer's state.

Can I transfer a so called "assault weapon" upon my death?

One can transfer a so called "assault weapon by bequest or intestate succession, or, upon the death of a testator or settlor:

  1. To a trust
  2. From a trust to a beneficiary who is eligible to possess the assault weapon

Note: Any person who obtains title to an assault weapon for which a certificate of possession has been issued by bequest or intestate succession shall, within ninety days of obtaining title, apply to the Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection for a certificate of possession, or render the assault weapon permanently inoperable, or sell the assault weapon to a licensed gun dealer or remove the assault weapon from the state.

Do I have to report the theft of a so called "assault weapon"?

Yes. Any person who lawfully possesses an assault weapon, or a firearm as defined above, that is lost or stolen from such person shall report the loss or theft to the organized local police department for the town in which the loss or theft occurred or, if such town does not have an organized local police department, to the state police troop having jurisdiction for such town within seventy-two hours of when such person discovered or should have discovered the loss or theft. Such department or troop shall forthwith forward a copy of such report to the Commissioner of Emergency Services and Public Protection.

Can I put a threaded barrel on a semiautomatic handgun?

Yes, if the semiautomatic handgun was manufactured prior to September 13, 1994 (aka a "preban") or if the semiautomatic handgun was registered as a so called "assault weapon" prior to January 1, 2014. Note: Some believe that one cannot add a threaded barrel to a handgun that didn't have one prior to 9/13/94. The general consensus on CTGunTalk.com is that one can add a threaded barrel to a "preban" handgun.

Can I add additional features to a so called"assault weapon"?

The laws/statutes do not appear to address this issue. Note: Some maintain that one cannot add additional features beyond the features the so called "assault weapon" had on the day it was registered with the state. The general consensus at CTGunTalk.com is that the law does not address this issue as such one can add features (or remove them) from so called "assault weapons". One cannot make an "assault weapon" any more assaulty or assaultier.

Can I buy a so called "assault weapon" outside of Connecticut?

Per federal law all handgun sales/transfers are supposed to take place within the buyer home state and must follow all state laws. For long gun sales, one can purchase or obtain a long gun in another state provided it is done through an FFL and that FFL is supposed to follow the laws of both, their state, and the laws of Connecticut. If you cannot legally buy the long gun within Connecticut you cannot go across state lines to buy it.

Do I have to keep the so called "assault weapon" locked up at home?

Connecticut does have a "safe storage" law that applies to all loaded firearms. If there are people; under the age of 16, or there are people residing within the home/residence who are ineligible to possess firearms under state/federal law, or a person residing within the home/residence who poses a risk of imminent personal injury to themselves or others, then all loaded firearms not under your immediate control or in your immediate proximity or carried on your persons, is supposed to be in a securely locked box or other container or in a location which a reasonable person would believe to be secure.

Can I transfer a so called "assault weapon" into a Trust?

The current statutes do not address the issue of transferring a so called "assault weapon" into a Trust. There is much conflicting information on this issue. It appears per some discussion that if the so called "assault weapon" was manufactured prior to 9/13/94 (i.e. a Preban) and the Trust was created prior to 4/4/13 then one may be able to transfer their so called "assault weapon" to the Trust. To do so called DESPP and inquire with them about the procedure.

Can one SBR (Short Barrel Rifle) a so called "assault weapon"?

Yes. ATF is apparently asking most people who submit the application to create a short barreled rifle (SBR) out of a so called "assault weapon" to included their Certificate of Possession with their application. For those with so called "assault weapons" manufactured prior to 9/13/94 (i.e. Preban) they can contact DESPP to obtain a Certificate of Possession for their firearm to be included with their application to SBR their rifle. One may also need to prove to DESPP the date of "preban" firearm manufacture via a letter from the firearm manufacturer indicating the firearm was manufactured prior to September 13, 1994.

Can I buy or create a rimfire AR-15 rifle or add features to a semiautomatic detachable magazine rimfire rifle?

Yes, provided the rimfire firearm does not exceed the feature count of the Old Law. This means you can have or add one feature, typically a pistol grip, to a semiautomatic detachable magazine rimfire rifle. All other banned features cannot be added to said firearm. Semiautomatic detachable magazine rimfire AR-15 type rifles are legal to buy or create so long as they conform to the Old Law. Stag Arms and M&P both make .22LR caliber AR-15 style rifles that are Connecticut legal.

Are there any AR-15 type rifles that I can buy?

Yes. It is generally recommended, if you have the money, to buy an AR-15 type rifle manufactured prior to 9/13/94. Reason being such a firearm is unencumbered by the feature ban. There are several manufacturers who have created AR-15 type rifles that are reported to be Connecticut legal.

Can I buy parts for a so called "assault weapon"?

The law does not address the issue of buying parts for so called "assault weapons" that have been registered with the state. The general consensus is that so long as the firearm is registered as a so called "assault weapon" it is legal to buy any parts to repair or modify the firearm.

I want to buy an AK-47, or some other firearm that is "banned by name", can I do so?

Currently, per current DESPP/SLFU opinion (see here and here), one can buy, sell or transfer any firearm that is banned by name provided it was manufactured prior to September 13, 1994. Note: Please read the relevant statute(s) prior to buying, selling or transferring a pre 9/13/94 manufactured "banned by name" firearm. The current DESPP/SLFU reinterpration of Sec. 53-202m may be at odds with the wording of the statute depending on how one interprets the language of the statute. The Office of Legislative Research has a differing opinion then that of DESPP/SLFU (see here).

I didn't register my so called "assault weapon" with the state, is there anything I can do?

If one is in possession of an illegal so called "assault weapon" they can either; move the firearm out of state, modified the firearm to render it permanently inoperable, modify the firearm so it is no longer a so called "assault weapon", turn the firearm over to law enforcement, sell the firearm to an authorized firearms dealer (FFL), or sell the firearm to someone outside of this state in accordance with federal law and the law's of the buyer's state.

I have an illegal so called "assault weapon", can I modify it to make it legal?

The general non legal consensus is that one can modify a so called "assault weapon" and remove the features that make it what the state considers a so called "assault weapon". This can include turning the so called "assault weapon" into a non semiautomatic firearm that is not subject to the feature ban. This can also include modifying the so called "assault weapon" so it is no longer capable of accepting a detachable magazine. Note: The legality of using devices that fix a magazine in place, or otherwise modify a firearm to remove it from being a so called "assault weapon", may or may not effectively modify the firearm to remove it from illegal status. It has been reported that SLFU will not issue an official ruling on certain devices that potentially convert a so called "assault weapon" into a non "assault weapon" firearm.

 

 

 

Large Capacity Magazines

What is a so called "large capacity magazine"?

"Large capacity magazine" means any firearm magazine, belt, drum, feed strip or similar device that has the capacity of, or can be readily restored or converted to accept, more than ten rounds of ammunition, but does not include:

  1. A feeding device that has been permanently altered so that it cannot accommodate more than ten rounds of ammunition
  2. A .22 caliber tube ammunition feeding device
  3. A tubular magazine that is contained in a lever-action firearm
  4. A magazine that is permanently inoperable

 

 

 

Large Capacity Magazine Definitions

"Lawfully possesses" - With respect to a large capacity magazine, means that a person has:

  1. Actual and lawful possession of the large capacity magazine
  2. Constructive possession of the large capacity magazine pursuant to a lawful purchase of a firearm that contains a large capacity magazine that was transacted prior to or on April 4, 2013, regardless of whether the firearm was delivered to the purchaser prior to or on April 4, 2013, which lawful purchase is evidenced by a writing sufficient to indicate that:
    1. A contract for sale was made between the parties prior to or on April 4, 2013, for the purchase of the firearm
    2. Full or partial payment for the firearm was made by the purchaser to the seller of the firearm prior to or on April 4, 2013
  3. Actual possession or constructive possession as evidenced by a written statement made under penalty of false statement on such form as the Commissioner of Emergency Services and Public Protection prescribes.

    Note: In order to declare a so called "large capacity magazine" with the state one has to prove they had "lawful possession" of it.

 

 

 

Questions about so called "large capacity magazines"

Are there "preban" magazines?

No. Unlike other states there is no provision for grandfathering of magazines manufactured prior to a specified date.

Where can so called "large capacity magazines" be legally possessed and how many rounds can they be legally loaded to at those locations?

Any person who declared possession of a large capacity magazine under this section may possess the large capacity magazine only under the following conditions:

  1. At that person's residence
  2. At that person's place of business or other property owned by that person, provided such large capacity magazine contains not more than ten bullets
  3. While on the premises of a target range of a public or private club or organization organized for the purpose of practicing shooting at targets
  4. While on a target range which holds a regulatory or business license for the purpose of practicing shooting at that target range
  5. While on the premises of a licensed shooting club
  6. While transporting the large capacity magazine between any of the places set forth in this subsection, or to any licensed gun dealer, provided:
    1. Such large capacity magazine contains not more than ten bullets
    2. The large capacity magazine is transported in the manner required for an assault weapons
  7. Pursuant to a valid permit to carry a pistol or revolver, provided such large capacity magazine:
    1. Is within a pistol or revolver that was lawfully possessed by the person prior to April 5, 2013
    2. Does not extend more than one inch below the bottom of the pistol grip
    3. Contains not more than ten bullets.

How are so called "large capacity magazines" supposed to be transported?

The large capacity magazine should be transported in the manner as assault weapons.

Who can purchase so called "large capacity magazines"?

The following organizations can purchase so called "large capacity magazines":

  1. The Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection, police departments, the Department of Correction, the Division of Criminal Justice, the Department of Motor Vehicles, the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection or the military or naval forces of this state or of the United States.
  2. A sworn and duly certified member of an organized police department, the Division of State Police within the Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection or the Department of Correction, a chief inspector or inspector in the Division of Criminal Justice, a salaried inspector of motor vehicles designated by the Commissioner of Motor Vehicles, a conservation officer or special conservation officer appointed by the Commissioner of Energy and Environmental, or a constable who is certified by the Police Officer Standards and Training Council and appointed by the chief executive authority of a town, city or borough to perform criminal law enforcement duties, for use by such sworn member, inspector, officer or constable in the discharge of such sworn member's, inspector's, officer's or constable's official duties or when off duty.
  3. A member of the military or naval forces of this state or of the United States.
  4. A nuclear facility licensed by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission for the purpose of providing security services at such facility, or any contractor or subcontractor of such facility for the purpose of providing security services at such facility.
  5. Any person who is sworn and acts as a policeman on behalf of an armored car in the discharge of such person's official duties.
  6. Any person, firm or corporation engaged in the business of manufacturing large capacity magazines in this state that manufactures, purchases, tests or transports large capacity magazines in this state for sale within this state to or for sale outside this state, or a federally-licensed firearm manufacturer engaged in the business of manufacturing firearms or large capacity magazines in this state that manufactures, purchases, tests or transports firearms or large capacity magazines in this state for sale within this state to persons specified above or for sale outside this state.

What happens when I leave one of the exempted organizations? Do I have to declare my so called "large capacity magazines"?

A large capacity magazine that was purchased or obtained by such person for official use before such person retired or separated from service shall declare possession of the large capacity magazine within ninety days of such retirement or separation from service to the Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection.

I'm active duty military or in the National Guard can I buy a so called "large capacity magazine"?

See the questions related to who can purchase so called "large capacity magazines", and questions related to "exempted organizations" to see if you are exempted from the bans on purchasing so called "large capacity magazine".

What happens if I move into this state with a so called "large capacity magazine"?

Generally any person who moves into the state with a so called "large capacity magazine" shall, within ninety days, either render the large capacity magazine permanently inoperable, render it incapable of holding more than 10 rounds of ammunition, sell the so called "large capacity magazine" to a licensed gun dealer (FFL), remove the so called "large capacity magazine" from this state, or sell the so called "large capacity magazine" to someone outside of this state. Except that any person who is a member of the military or naval forces of this state or of the United States, who is in lawful possession of a a so called "large capacity magazine" and has been transferred into the state after January 1, 2014, may, within ninety days of arriving in the state, apply to the Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection to declare possession of such large capacity magazine.

What happens if I move out of this state with a so called "large capacity magazine"?

The law does not appear to deal with moving out of this state with so called "large capacity magazines". There does not appear to be a requirement to notify the state of your new address so they can update the magazine declaration form.

Can I sell a so called "large capacity magazine"?

Yes. So called "large capacity magazines can be sold out of state. However, generally within this state one can only sell them to a licensed gun dealer.

Can I transfer a so called "large capacity magazine" upon my death?

Yes. The transfer of a large capacity magazine, the possession of which has been declared to the Department of Emergency Services and Public, can be transferred by bequest or intestate succession, or, upon the death of a testator or settlor:

  1. To a trust
  2. From a trust to a beneficiary

Note: There is however no apparent way listed in the statutes (as of 12/13/94) for someone who receives a magazine via this method to declare them to DESPP.

Do I have to report the theft of a so called "large capacity magazine"?

At this time the laws/statutes do not appear to indicate one is required to report the theft or destruction of so called "large capacity magazines".

Can I carry spare so called "large capacity magazines" in public?

No. The law indicates (see above) that one must carry the so called "large capacity magazine" (loaded to 10 rounds) within the handgun. All spare magazines must be non-large capacity magazines loaded to 10 rounds or less.

Can I buy a so called "large capacity magazine" outside of Connecticut?

Yes. However, you cannot bring it back into Connecticut if it is capable of holding more than 10 rounds of ammunition.

Can I "block" my so called "large capacity magazine" so it only holds 10 rounds?

Yes. Once you permanently block your magazine so it cannot hold more than 10 rounds, it is no longer considered a "large capacity magazine".

I purchased a handgun after April 4, 2013 and want to carry it in public; can I carry a so called "large capacity magazine" in this handgun?

No. If the handgun was purchased on or after April 5, 2013, you cannot carry a so called "large capacity magazine" within it while in public. You can only use 10 round capacity magazines in post 4/4/13 purchased handguns when carrying in public.

I heard that magazines cannot extend beyond the grip of the handgun, is this true?

The restriction on magazines extending beyond the grip of the handgun applies only to "large capacity magazines" within handguns carried in public. The state has clarified this prohibition to say that so called "large capacity magazines" cannot extend more than one inch below the bottom of the pistol grip when carried in public.

Can I buy replacement parts for a so called "large capacity magazine"?

The law does not address this issue. The general consensus is that one can buy all parts related to magazines. However if one assembles those parts into a functioning so called "large capacity magazine" that is capable of holding more than 10 rounds of ammunition, and that so called "large capacity magazine" has not been declared to the state, then they will have created an illegal large capacity magazine under the law. There are certain exceptions to this prohibition, please see the actual statute for more information on who can manufacture or possess so called "large capacity magazines".

I didn't declare my so called "large capacity magazine" with the state, is there anything I can do?

If one is in possession of an illegal so called "large capacity magazine" they can either; move the so called "large capacity magazine" out of state, modified the so called "large capacity magazine" to render it permanently inoperable or capable of accepting ammunition, modify the so called "large capacity magazine" so it is not capable of accepting more than 10 rounds of ammunition, turn the so called "large capacity magazine" over to law enforcement, sell the so called "large capacity magazine" to an authorized firearms dealer (FFL), or sell the so called "large capacity magazine" to someone outside of this state in accordance with federal law and the law's of the buyer's state.

 

 

 

Ammunition

What is ammunition?

"Ammunition" means:

A loaded cartridge, consisting of a primed case, propellant or projectile, designed for use in any firearm.

A "firearm" as it relates to ammunition means; any sawed-off shotgun, machine gun, rifle, shotgun, pistol, revolver or other weapon, whether loaded or unloaded from which a shot may be discharged.

 

 

 

Armor piercing and incendiary .50 caliber ammunition

"Armor piercing bullet" means:

  1. Any .50 caliber bullet that:
    1. Is designed for the purpose of,
    2. Is held out by the manufacturer or distributor as, or
    3. Is generally recognized as having a specialized capability to penetrate armor or bulletproof glass, including, but not limited to, such bullets commonly designated as "M2 Armor-Piercing" or "AP", "M8 Armor-Piercing Incendiary" or "API", "M20 Armor-Piercing Incendiary Tracer" or "APIT", "M903 Caliber .50 Saboted Light Armor Penetrator" or "SLAP", or "M962 Saboted Light Armor Penetrator Tracer" or "SLAPT"
  2. Any bullet that can be fired from a pistol or revolver that:
    1. has projectiles or projectile cores constructed entirely, excluding the presence of traces of other substances, from tungsten alloys, steel, iron, brass, bronze, beryllium copper or depleted uranium, or
    2. is fully jacketed with a jacket weight of more than twenty-five per cent of the total weight of the projectile, is larger than .22 caliber and is designed and intended for use in a firearm, and (iii) does not have projectiles whose cores are composed of soft materials such as lead or lead alloys, zinc or zinc alloys, frangible projectiles designed primarily for sporting purposes, or any other projectiles or projectile cores that the Attorney General of the United States finds to be primarily intended to be used for sporting purposes or industrial purposes or that otherwise does not constitute "armor piercing ammunition" as defined in federal law. "Armor piercing bullet" does not include a shotgun shell.

"Incendiary .50 caliber bullet" means any .50 caliber bullet that:

  1. is designed for the purpose of,
  2. is held out by the manufacturer or distributor as, or is generally recognized as having a specialized capability to ignite upon impact, including, but not limited to, such bullets commonly designated as "M1 Incendiary", "M23 Incendiary", "M8 Armor-Piercing Incendiary" or "API", or "M20 Armor-Piercing Incendiary Tracer" or "APIT".

 

 

 

Questions about ammunition

Who can buy ammunition?

Anyone who is 18 years of age or older can buy an ammunition. However, one is required to present one of the required permits or certificates when purchasing an ammunition magazine within the state of Connecticut.

Do I have to show a state issued permit or certificate to buy ammunition?

Yes. The state of Connecticut has mandated that anyone buying an ammunition within the state of Connecticut is supposed to show the seller one of the following forms of state issued identification:

  1. A valid permit to carry a pistol or revolver.
  2. A valid eligibility certificate for a pistol or revolver.
  3. A valid long gun eligibility certificate.
  4. A valid ammunition certificate. Note: The statute also indicates when presenting a valid ammunition certificate one is also present to the seller their motor vehicle operator’s license, passport or other valid form of identification issued by the federal government or a state or municipal government that contains such person’s date of birth and photograph.

The relevant permits or certificates can be obtained from DESPP. See: Special Licensing and Firearms - Firearms and Permit Related Forms and Information for more information.

Can a non resident buy an ammunition in this state?

Yes. But only if they obtain one of the permits or certificates that allows one to purchase ammunition. One can contact DESPP to obtain one of the required permits or certificates.

Can one buy an ammunition outside of this state or online?

Yes. If one is outside of Connecticut they can purchase ammunition or one can purchase ammunition online. Note: Technically one does not have to follow this state's purchase requirements while in another state. Unlike with firearms there is no federal mandate one follow the laws of their own state when buying an ammunition in person outside of Connecticut. However, most if not all online retailers, will mandate you sent them (either via fax or email) a copy of one of the permits or certificates that allow for ammunition purchases. It has been reported that some neighboring state gun shops are asking Connecticut residents show one of the relevant permits or certificates when purchasing ammunition.

Can someone give me ammunition?

Yes. The statues do not appear to prohibit giving ammunition to someone who is not prohibited from possessing it. Note: Exchanging ammunition for something of value may be seen as a "sale".

Is there anyone who is exempt from the requirements to show a permit or certificate when buying an ammunition?

Yes. The following is a list of individuals who are exempt from the mandate to show a permit or certificate when purchasing an ammunition:

  1. The Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection, police departments, the Department of Correction, the Division of Criminal Justice, the Department of Motor Vehicles, the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection or the military or naval forces of this state or of the United States.
  2. A sworn and duly certified member of an organized police department, the Division of State Police within the Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection or the Department of Correction, a chief inspector or inspector in the Division of Criminal Justice, a salaried inspector of motor vehicles designated by the Commissioner of Motor Vehicles, a conservation officer or special conservation officer appointed by the Commissioner of Energy and Environmental Protection pursuant to section 26-5, or a constable who is certified by the Police Officer Standards and Training Council and appointed by the chief executive authority of a town, city or borough to perform criminal law enforcement duties, for use by such sworn member, inspector, officer or constable in the discharge of such sworn member’s, inspector’s, officer’s or constable’s official duties or when off duty.
  3. A member of the military or naval forces of this state or of the United States.
  4. A nuclear facility licensed by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission for the purpose of providing security services at such facility, or any contractor or subcontractor of such facility for the purpose of providing security services at such facility.
  5. A federally licensed firearm manufacturer, importer, dealer or collector.

Who can buy or transport armor piercing or .50 caliber incendiary ammunition?

The sale, transfer, and transportation of such ammunition can be made to or by the following organizations:

  1. The Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection, police departments, the Department of Correction or the military or naval forces of this state or of the United States for use in the discharge of their official duties
  2. A sworn and duly certified member of the Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection or a police department when transporting or carrying a firearm with an armor piercing bullet or incendiary .50 caliber bullet loaded
  3. A person who is the executor or administrator of an estate that includes such ammunition that is disposed of as authorized by the Probate Court
  4. The transfer of such ammunition by bequest or intestate succession, or, upon the death of a testator or settlor:
    1. To a trust, or
    2. From a trust to a beneficiary who is eligible to possess such ammunition.

Can I buy armor piercing or .50 caliber incendiary ammunition outside of Connecticut and bring it back into the state?

No. Any person transports or imports into the state, any ammunition that is an armor piercing bullet or an incendiary .50 caliber bullet shall be guilty of a class D felony, except that a first-time violation shall be a class A misdemeanor.

Can I carry or transport a firearm loaded with armor piercing or .50 caliber incendiary ammunition?

No. Any person unless they are a member of an exempted organization who knowingly transports or carries a firearm with an armor piercing bullet or incendiary .50 caliber bullet loaded shall be guilty of a class D felony.

Who is prohibited from buying or possessing ammunition?

No one under the age of 18 can buy ammunition.

One who has been convicted of the following misdemeanors cannot apply for an Ammunition Certificate if convicted on or after July 1, 2013. Those convicted of felonies or are federally prohibited, no matter the date of conviction, cannot apply for apply for the Ammunition Certificate.

The prohibiting misdemeanors:

  1. Illegal possession of narcotics or other controlled substances - 21a-279(c)
  2. Criminally negligent homicide - 53a-58
  3. Assault in the third degree - 53a-61
  4. Assault of a victim 60 or older in the third degree - 53a-61a
  5. Threatening - 53a-62
  6. Reckless endangerment in the first degree - 53a-63
  7. Unlawful restraint in the second degree - 53a-96
  8. Riot in the first degree - 53a-175
  9. Riot in the second degree - 53a-176
  10. Inciting to riot - 53a-178
  11. Stalking in the second degree - 53a-181d

Generally federal law, 18 U.S.C. § 922(g), prohibits the following from possessing, shipping/transporting, or receiving any firearm or ammunition:

  1. A person convicted of a crime punishable by imprisonment exceeding one year
  2. A person who is a fugitive from justice
  3. A person who is an unlawful user of or who is addicted to a controlled substance
  4. A person who has been adjudicated as a mental defective or who has been admitted to a mental institution
  5. An alien who is unlawfully in the United States or who has been admitted to the United States under a nonimmigrant visa
  6. A person who has been discharged from the Armed Forces under dishonorable conditions
  7. A person who, having been a citizen of the United States, renounces his citizenship
  8. A person subject to a court order that was issued after a hearing in which the person participated, which order restrains the person from harassing, stalking, or threatening an intimate partner or partner’s child, and which order includes a finding that the person is a credible threat to such partner or partner’s child, or by its terms prohibits the use, attempted use or threatened use of such force against such partner or partner’s child
  9. A person who has been convicted of a misdemeanor crime of domestic violence.

Note: See: Who is prohibited from possessing firearms? for a list of prohibitions that apply to Pistol Permits and Eligibility Certificate for Pistols and Revolvers, and Eligibility Certificate for Long Guns if convicted after October 1, 1994.

 

 

 

Ammunition Magazines

What is an ammunition magazine?

The state of Connecticut considers an ammunition magazine to be any; firearm magazine, belt, drum, feed strip or similar device that accepts ammunition.

 

 

 

Questions about ammunition magazines

Who can buy ammunition magazines?

Anyone who is 18 years of age or older can buy an ammunition magazine. However, one is required to present one of the required permits or certificates when purchasing an ammunition magazine within the state of Connecticut.

Do I have to show a state issued permit or certificate to buy an ammunition magazine?

Yes. The state of Connecticut has mandated that anyone buying an ammunition magazine within the state of Connecticut is supposed to show the seller one of the following forms of state issued identification:

  1. A valid permit to carry a pistol or revolver.
  2. A valid eligibility certificate for a pistol or revolver.
  3. A valid long gun eligibility certificate.
  4. A valid ammunition certificate. Note: The statute also indicates when presenting a valid ammunition certificate one is also present to the seller their motor vehicle operator’s license, passport or other valid form of identification issued by the federal government or a state or municipal government that contains such person’s date of birth and photograph.

The relevant permits or certificates can be obtained from DESPP. See: Special Licensing and Firearms - Firearms and Permit Related Forms and Information for more information.

Can a non resident buy an ammunition magazine in this state?

Yes. But only if they obtain one of the permits or certificates that allows one to purchase ammunition magazines. One can contact DESPP to obtain one of the required permits or certificates.

Can one buy an ammunition magazine outside of this state or online?

Yes. If one is outside of Connecticut they can purchase ammunition magazines or one can purchase ammunition magazines online. Note: Technically one does not have to follow this state's purchase requirements while in another state. Unlike with firearms there is no federal mandate one follow the laws of their own state when buying an ammunition magazine in person outside of Connecticut. However, most if not all online retailers, will mandate you sent them (either via fax or email) a copy of one of the permits or certificates that allow for ammunition purchases. It has been reported that some neighboring state gun shops are asking Connecticut residents show one of the relevant permits or certificates when purchasing ammunition magazines.

Can someone give me an ammunition magazine?

Yes. The statues do not appear to prohibit giving ammunition to someone who is not prohibited from possessing it. Note: Exchanging ammunition for something of value may be seen as a "sale".

Is there anyone who is exempt from the requirements to show a permit or certificate when buying an ammunition magazine?

Yes. The following is a list of individuals who are exempt from the mandate to show a permit or certificate when purchasing an ammunition magazine:

  1. The Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection, police departments, the Department of Correction, the Division of Criminal Justice, the Department of Motor Vehicles, the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection or the military or naval forces of this state or of the United States.
  2. A sworn and duly certified member of an organized police department, the Division of State Police within the Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection or the Department of Correction, a chief inspector or inspector in the Division of Criminal Justice, a salaried inspector of motor vehicles designated by the Commissioner of Motor Vehicles, a conservation officer or special conservation officer appointed by the Commissioner of Energy and Environmental Protection pursuant to section 26-5, or a constable who is certified by the Police Officer Standards and Training Council and appointed by the chief executive authority of a town, city or borough to perform criminal law enforcement duties, for use by such sworn member, inspector, officer or constable in the discharge of such sworn member’s, inspector’s, officer’s or constable’s official duties or when off duty.
  3. A member of the military or naval forces of this state or of the United States.
  4. A nuclear facility licensed by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission for the purpose of providing security services at such facility, or any contractor or subcontractor of such facility for the purpose of providing security services at such facility.
  5. A federally licensed firearm manufacturer, importer, dealer or collector.

Who is prohibited from buying or possessing an ammunition magazine?

No one under the age of 18 can buy an ammunition magazine.

One who has been convicted of the following misdemeanors cannot apply for an Ammunition Certificate if convicted on or after July 1, 2013. Those convicted of felonies or are federally prohibited, no matter the date of conviction, cannot apply for apply for the Ammunition Certificate.

The prohibiting misdemeanors:

  1. Illegal possession of narcotics or other controlled substances - 21a-279(c)
  2. Criminally negligent homicide - 53a-58
  3. Assault in the third degree - 53a-61
  4. Assault of a victim 60 or older in the third degree - 53a-61a
  5. Threatening - 53a-62
  6. Reckless endangerment in the first degree - 53a-63
  7. Unlawful restraint in the second degree - 53a-96
  8. Riot in the first degree - 53a-175
  9. Riot in the second degree - 53a-176
  10. Inciting to riot - 53a-178
  11. Stalking in the second degree - 53a-181d

Generally federal law, 18 U.S.C. § 922(g), prohibits the following from possessing, shipping/transporting, or receiving any firearm or ammunition:

  1. A person convicted of a crime punishable by imprisonment exceeding one year
  2. A person who is a fugitive from justice
  3. A person who is an unlawful user of or who is addicted to a controlled substance
  4. A person who has been adjudicated as a mental defective or who has been admitted to a mental institution
  5. An alien who is unlawfully in the United States or who has been admitted to the United States under a nonimmigrant visa
  6. A person who has been discharged from the Armed Forces under dishonorable conditions
  7. A person who, having been a citizen of the United States, renounces his citizenship
  8. A person subject to a court order that was issued after a hearing in which the person participated, which order restrains the person from harassing, stalking, or threatening an intimate partner or partner’s child, and which order includes a finding that the person is a credible threat to such partner or partner’s child, or by its terms prohibits the use, attempted use or threatened use of such force against such partner or partner’s child
  9. A person who has been convicted of a misdemeanor crime of domestic violence.

Note: See: Who is prohibited from possessing firearms? for a list of prohibitions that apply to Pistol Permits and Eligibility Certificate for Pistols and Revolvers, and Eligibility Certificate for Long Guns if convicted after October 1, 1994.

 

 

 

Long Guns And Hand Guns

Long guns

Long guns are generally considered to be rifles and shotguns.

The state of Connecticut considers a rifle to mean; a weapon designed or redesigned, made or remade, and intended to be fired from the shoulder and designed or redesigned and made or remade to use the energy of the explosive in a fixed metallic cartridge to fire only a single projectile through a rifled bore for each single pull of the trigger.

The state of Connecticut considers a shotgun to mean; a weapon designed or redesigned, made or remade, and intended to be fired from the shoulder and designed or redesigned and made or remade to use the energy of the explosive in a fixed shotgun shell to fire through a smooth bore either a number of ball shot or a single projectile for each single pull of the trigger.

 

 

 

Hand guns

Hand guns are generally considered to be pistols and revolvers.

The state of Connecticut generally considers a pistol or revolver to mean; any firearm having a barrel less than twelve inches.

The state of Connecticut generally considers a firearm to mean; any sawed-off shotgun, machine gun, rifle, shotgun, pistol, revolver or other weapon, whether loaded or unloaded from which a shot may be discharged.

 

 

 

Black powder firearms and antique firearms

Generally black powder firearms will fall into the same category as antique firearms due to their inability to utilize rimfire or centerfire fixed ammunition and due to some of them being a replica of any firearm manufactured on or before 1898.

The state of Connecticut generally considers an antique firearm to mean; any firearm which was manufactured in or before 1898 and any replica of such firearm, provided such replica is not designed or redesigned for using rimfire or conventional centerfire fixed ammunition except rimfire or conventional centerfire fixed ammunition which is no longer manufactured in the United States and not readily available in the ordinary channel of commercial trade.

 

 

 

Questions on long guns and hand guns

Can I buy a long gun or hand gun in a face to face sale within this state?

Yes. The general procedure for both long gun and hand gun face to faces sales is as follows:

For long guns:

  1. The buyer cannot be prohibited from possessing firearms (long guns).
  2. If buying/selling a “preban” long gun, buyer should present to the seller a letter from the firearm manufacturer attesting to the manufacture date being prior to September 13, 1994. (Note: SLFU rule/opinion)
  3. Buyer must present the seller one of the following; a valid long gun eligibility certificate, a valid permit to carry a pistol or revolver, a valid permit to sell at retail a pistol or revolver, or a valid eligibility certificate for a pistol or revolver.
  4. Call DESPP ((860) 685-8400, or 1-(888) 335-8438) for an authorization number.
  5. The seller fills out three separate DPS-3-C forms. Sends one to the Commissioner of Emergency Services and Public Protection. Sends one to the chief of police or the warden of the borough or the first selectman, of the town in which the buyer resides. And the seller retains the last one for at least five years. Note: It is recommended one fill out a fourth DPS-3-C and give it to the buyer even though the statutes don't require it for long guns.

For hand guns:

  1. The buyer cannot be prohibited from possessing firearms (hand guns).
  2. If buying/selling a “preban” hand gun, buyer should present to the seller a letter from the firearm manufacturer attesting to the manufacture date being prior to September 13, 1994. (Note: SLFU rule/opinion)
  3. Buyer must present to the seller their valid CT Permit to carry Pistols or Revolvers or a valid CT Pistol Eligibility Certificate.
  4. Call DESPP ((860) 685-8400, or 1-(888) 335-8438) for an authorization number.
  5. The seller fills out a DPS-67-C form and retains it for 20 years.
  6. The seller fills out four separate DPS-3-C forms. The seller gives one to the buyer at point of sale/transfer. Sends one to the Commissioner of Emergency Services and Public Protection. Sends one to the chief of police or the warden of the borough or the first selectman, of the town in which the buyer resides. And the seller retains the last one for at least five years.

Note: A "Peban" long gun or hand gun is what many firearm owners call a firearm manufactured PRIOR to September 13, 1994 which meets the state's definition of a so called "assault weapon" under the statutes as they were on January 1, 2013. Prebans are exempt from the so called "assault weapon" registration requirements (Certificate of Possession), and can be legally bought, sold, or transferred. Note: There is some disagreement by some who believe the firearm had to be an assault weapon prior to 9/13/94. Others believe that it doesn't matter when the firearm became a so called "assault weapon", all that matters is that it was manufactured prior to 9/13/94.

Note: If including ammunition magazines and or ammunition with the firearm sale, the law indicates that the buyer should present one of the following permits/certificates to the seller before they are allowed to take possession of the ammunition magazines. Acceptable permits/certificates: a valid permit to carry a pistol or revolver, valid permit to sell at retail a pistol or revolver, valid eligibility certificate for a pistol or revolver, valid long gun eligibility certificate, or a valid ammunition certificate in addition to a person's motor vehicle operator's license, passport or other valid form of identification issued by the federal government or a state or municipal government that contains such person's date of birth and photograph. Active duty law enforcement officers may produce their badge and official police photo ID rather than one of the previously mentioned permits/certificates when obtaining ammunition and ammunition magazines.

Forms:

DPS-67-C

DPS-3-C

The relevant permits or certificates can be obtained from DESPP. See: Special Licensing and Firearms - Firearms and Permit Related Forms and Information for more information.

Can I buy a long gun outside of this state?

Yes. However, one is required by federal law to purchase or otherwise acquire a long gun (rifle or shotgun) in person on the premises of a person or business holding a federal firearms license (FFL). Furthermore the sale is supposed to; comply with state laws applicable in the state of sale and the state where the purchaser resides. See this ATF FAQ entry for more information.

Can I buy a hand gun outside of this state?

Yes. However, the hand gun is required by federal law to be transferred to the buyer through a federal firearm licensee (FFL) in the buyer's home state. Generally many Connecticut FFL's will require the hand gun to be shipped from an out of state FFL to them. Connecticut FFL's will typically will request that the out of state FFL fax or email their FFL license to the Connecticut FFL prior to shipping the hand gun to them. There may be one or two Connecticut FFL's who will accept or receive a hand gun shipped to them by a private individual. They may require that the private individual provide a license or other ID prior to receiving the hand gun shipment from them. Some have indicated that someone from outside of Connecticut can drive the hand gun into Connecticut to a Connecticut FFL to make the transfer to a Connecticut resident. Check with your FFL to see what method they recommend when it comes to receiving a hand gun from an out of state individual. See this ATF FAQ entry for more information.

Can I arrange to have a long gun or hand gun shipped to my local federal firearm licensee?

Yes. See this ATF FAQ entry for more information.

When buying a long gun or hand gun can it come with a large capacity magazine?

No. Only those who are exempted individuals can have a large capacity magazine included with a long gun or hand gun they purchase. See the following exempted individuals list earlier in this FAQ for those who are exempted from having to show one of the relevant permits or certificates for buying ammunition magazines.

Can I carry a hand gun in public without a permit?

No. One is required by state law to have a valid pistol permit when carrying a hand gun in public. One is required to have such permit upon their person while carrying in public. There are several exceptions to the mandate to have a valid pistol permit while carrying in public. The requirement to have a valid pistol permit while public do not apply to the following individuals or under the following instances:

  1. Any parole officer or peace officer of this state, or any Department of Motor Vehicles inspector.
  2. Any parole officer or peace officer of any other state while engaged in the pursuit of official duties.
  3. Any federal marshal or federal law enforcement agent.
  4. Any member of the armed forces of the United States, when on duty or going to or from duty.
  5. Any member of any military organization when on parade or when going to or from any place of assembly.
  6. During the transportation of pistols or revolvers as merchandise.
  7. While transporting any pistol or revolver while contained in the package in which it was originally wrapped at the time of sale and while transporting the same from the place of sale to the purchaser’s residence or place of business.
  8. While removing a person’s household goods or effects from one place to another.
  9. While transporting any such pistol or revolver from such person’s place of residence or business to a place or individual where or by whom such pistol or revolver is to be repaired or while returning to such person’s place of residence or business after the same has been repaired.
  10. While transporting a pistol or revolver in or through the state for the purpose of taking part in competitions.
  11. While taking part in formal pistol or revolver training.
  12. While repairing such pistol or revolver or attending any meeting or exhibition of an organized collectors’ group if such person is a bona fide resident of the United States and is permitted to possess and carry a pistol or revolver in the state or subdivision of the United States in which such person resides.
  13. While transporting a pistol or revolver to and from a testing range at the request of the issuing authority.
  14. While transporting an antique pistol or revolver.

Note: “formal pistol or revolver training” means pistol or revolver training at a locally approved or permitted firing range or training facility, and “transporting a pistol or revolver” means transporting a pistol or revolver that is unloaded and, if such pistol or revolver is being transported in a motor vehicle, is not readily accessible or directly accessible from the passenger compartment of the vehicle or, if such pistol or revolver is being transported in a motor vehicle that does not have a compartment separate from the passenger compartment, such pistol or revolver shall be contained in a locked container other than the glove compartment or console. Nothing in this answer shall be construed to prohibit the carrying of a pistol or revolver during formal pistol or revolver training or repair.

For more information on pistol permits contact DESPP or your local issuing authority. See: Special Licensing and Firearms - Firearms and Permit Related Forms and Information for more information.

Do I have to show a permit or certificate to buy a black powder firearm or an antique?

No.

The state exempts antique long guns provided they are; manufactured in or before 1898, including any firearm with a matchlock, flintlock, percussion cap or similar type of ignition system manufactured in or before 1898 and any antique firearm or replica uses rimfire or conventional centerfire fixed ammunition which is no longer manufactured in the United States and which is not readily available in the ordinary channels of commercial trade.

The state exempts antique pistols or revolvers provided they are; manufactured in or before 1898 and any replica of such pistol or revolver provided such replica is not designed or redesigned for using rimfire or conventional centerfire fixed ammunition except rimfire or conventional centerfire fixed ammunition which is no longer manufactured in the United States and not readily available in the ordinary channel of commercial trade.

Can I carry a black powder or antique pistol or revolver in public?

One is required to have a valid pistol permit on their person while carrying a pistol or revolver. Note: One is allowed to "transport" an antique pistol or revolver without a valid pistol permit. Transporting a pistol or revolver means; transporting a pistol or revolver that is unloaded and, if such pistol or revolver is being transported in a motor vehicle, is not readily accessible or directly accessible from the passenger compartment of the vehicle or, if such pistol or revolver is being transported in a motor vehicle that does not have a compartment separate from the passenger compartment, such pistol or revolver shall be contained in a locked container other than the glove compartment or console. Nothing in this answer shall be construed to prohibit the carrying of a pistol or revolver during formal pistol or revolver training or repair.

Can I move into Connecticut with long guns and hand guns, and do I need to obtain a permit or certificate before I move into Connecticut?

There is no prohibition on moving into this state with long guns and or hand guns. One is prohibited from brining in firearms the state considers "assault weapons". Note: There is some disagreement if this prohibition on so called "assault weapons" includes "prebans". However, one cannot be prohibited from possessing firearms in this state when they move their firearms into this state. See: Who is prohibited from possessing firearms for more information.

One cannot carry, with certain exceptions, a pistol or revolver outside of their home or business without a valid pistol permit.

Before one moves into this state, one can contact DESPP and obtain a permit to carry pistols or revolvers. See: Special Licensing and Firearms - Connecticut State Pistol Permit for more information.

Note: General it will take DESPP about eight weeks issue a non resident pistol permit. A non resident can also obtain Ammunition Certificate by contacting DESPP. One can then contact/notify DESPP of their new Connecticut address. Generally one has two business days to notify DESPP upon one's change of address with respect to the various firearm and ammunition permits and certificates.

Can I drive through Connecticut with long guns or hand guns?

Yes. Non residents can transit the state of Connecticut with long guns and hand guns provided they observe the following requirements:

  1. One is in accordance with 18 U.S.C. 926A and 927.
  2. Is not otherwise prohibited from shipping, transporting, receiving or possessing a firearm.
  3. Is transporting a firearm for any lawful purpose from any place where such person may lawfully possess and carry such firearm through this state to any other place where such person may lawfully possess and carry such firearm provided such transportation.
  4. During the transportation of a firearm through this state the firearm shall be unloaded and neither such firearm nor any ammunition being transported shall be readily accessible or directly accessible from the passenger compartment of the vehicle. If the vehicle does not have a compartment separate from the passenger compartment, such firearm shall be unloaded and such firearm and any ammunition being transported shall be contained in a locked container other than the glove compartment or console.
  5. No person who is transporting a firearm through this state may use or carry such firearm or sell, deliver or otherwise transfer such firearm while in this state.

Note: One can carry a hand gun provided they have a valid Connecticut Permit to Carry Pistol or Revolver.

Are there any limitations on where or how I carry a firearm in Connecticut?

The state does not currently mandate method of carry for hand guns or long guns. Both open and conceal carry of hand guns are legal. Note: Some recommend not open carrying a hand gun. This document does not recommend method of carry. In the past there have been a few limited instances of police responding to people seen open carrying. Choose the method of carry one is comfortable with and be prepared to deal with police if confronted. While there is no specific statute prohibiting carry of a long gun not classified as a so called "assault weapon", the general consensus by many is to avoid carrying a long gun in public unless hunting or on one's own property. If one is choosing to carry a long gun in public be prepared to possibly be confronted by police, possibly detained, and possibly arrested.

The following is a general list of locations that typically or by statute prohibit firearms within the state of Connecticut:

  1. A known or signed "gun free zone"
  2. K-12 schools
  3. Court houses
  4. State work sites (Note: Only applies to state employees)
  5. Legislative buildings where legislative offices exist
  6. Federal courthouses
  7. Federal buildings
  8. Buildings owned, rented or leased by the federal government
  9. Federal prisons
  10. National cemeteries
  11. Military bases
  12. Post offices including parking lots or other property owned by the United States Postal Service
  13. State of Connecticut parks and forests

Note: Indian reservations and casinos are governed by their respective tribal counsels and have their own tribal rules on carrying firearms on Indian/tribal property. If visiting one of the Connecticut Indian casino's call ahead to inquire about legally carrying on their property.

Note: This is by no means a comprehensive list of locations that prohibit or limit carry of firearms. When in doubt contact those who manage/own the location to see what their polices are with respect to legally carrying at that location. Typically most malls within this state have "codes of conduct" that prohibit firearms on premises. Most if not all universities and colleges within this state also prohibit their students and employees from carrying firearms upon their property.

Note: Some will recommend ignoring the prohibition on carrying firearms at various locations within this state or in a signed or known "gun free zone". If one chooses to carry into a known location that prohibits firearms understand the penalties including possible jail time if one is discovered doing so and subsequently charged and convicted. This document does not recommend nor condone carrying in locations that prohibit firearms.

Can I carry a hand gun in a bar or other location that serves liquor?

Yes. The law does not prohibit carry in a bar, restaurant or other location that serves liquor. However, the law DOES prohibit carrying a "loaded" firearm upon one's person while under the influence of intoxicating liquor or drug, or both. The state defines a "loaded" firearm as one; which is loaded and from which a shot may be discharged. The state also indicates one cannot carry when the ratio of alcohol in the blood of such person is ten-hundredths of one per cent or more of alcohol, by weight.

Am I required to show my pistol permit when a police officer asks for it?

The statute Sec. 29-28(b) has been recently amended by Public Act No. 15-216 to indicate that starting on October 1, 2015, in addition to having one's valid pistol permit upon their person while carrying, one shall present his or her permit upon the request of a law enforcement officer who has reasonable suspicion of a crime for purposes of verification of the validity of the permit or identification of the holder, provided such holder is carrying a pistol or revolver that is observed by such law enforcement officer. Note: Outside of the elements presented in the amended Sec. 29-28(b), failure to show one's valid pistol permit upon demand by law enforcement may constitute interfering with a police officer in the performance of their duties. Which can be an arrestable offence (Sec. 53a-167a. Interfering with an officer: Class A misdemeanor or class D felony).

Who is prohibited from possessing firearms?

Persons prohibited from possessing firearms will be prohibited from buying them or obtaining one of the relevant permits to buy them. The following individuals are prohibited from possessing firearms:

  1. No person convicted for a Felony or a Misdemeanor crime of domestic violence involving the use or threatened use of physical force or a deadly weapon may possess any firearms in Connecticut.
  2. No person may obtain a Pistol Permit, Eligibility Certificate, or possess any handguns if they are less than 21 years of age, subject to a Protective or Re straining Order, or if they have been convicted of a felony, or convicted in Connecticut for any of the following misdemeanors:
    1. Illegal possession of narcotics or other controlled substances - 21a-279(c)
    2. Criminally negligent homicide - 53a-58
    3. Assault in the third degree - 53a-61
    4. Assault of a victim 60 or older in the third degree - 53a-61a
    5. Threatening - 53a-62
    6. Reckless endangerment in the first degree - 53a-63
    7. Unlawful restraint in the second degree - 53a-96
    8. Riot in the first degree - 53a-175
    9. Riot in the second degree - 53a-176
    10. Inciting to riot - 53a-178
    11. Stalking in the second degree - 53a-181d
  3. Has been convicted as delinquent for the commission of a serious juvenile offense
  4. Has been discharged from custody within the preceding twenty years after having been found not guilty of a crime by reason of mental disease or defect , or
  5. Has been confined in a hospital for persons with psychiatric disabilities, as defined in section 17a-495, within the preceding sixty months by order of a probate court,
  6. Has been voluntarily admitted to a hospital for persons with psychiatric disabilities as defined in 17a-495 within the preceding six months for care and treatment of a psychiatric disability and not solely for alcohol or drug dependency, or Is subject to a firearms seizure order issued pursuant to Connecticut General Statute Section 29-38c after notice and an opportunity to be heard has been provided to such person, or is an alien illegally or unlawfully in the United States.
  7. Any federal disqualifiers listed in Title 18 U.S.C Chapter 44.

The firearms prohibitors apply to; Pistol Permits and Eligibility Certificate for Pistols and Revolvers, and Eligibility Certificate for Long Guns if convicted after October 1, 1994. The prohibiting misdemeanors also apply to Ammunition Certificate if convicted on or after July 1, 2013. Felonies and federal prohibitors apply to all permits and certificates as well as gun sales, no matter what the date of conviction.

I have a valid pistol permit why cannot I carry in or on school property?

Both Federal law and Connecticut statute cover firearms on school grounds. The Connecticut statue defines school grounds as; public or private elementary or secondary school grounds. State law prohibits firearms on school grounds unless one has the express permission of school administrators to carry firearms on said property. Federal law prohibits, except under certain narrow circumstances, firearms within 1,000 feet of a school. Federal law defines schools as; public, parochial or private school that provides elementary or secondary education, as determined under state law.

Note: There are certain narrow exceptions in state law to the prohibition of firearms on school grounds and they are; in a program approved by school officials in or on such school property or at such school-sponsored activity, in accordance with an agreement entered into between school officials and such person or such person’s employer, by a peace officer, while engaged in the performance of such peace officer’s official duties, or while traversing such school property for the purpose of gaining access to public or private lands open to hunting or for other lawful purposes, provided such firearm is not loaded and the entry on such school property is permitted by the local or regional board of education.

I live within 1,000 feet of a school, am I prohibited from having or possessing firearms in my home or on my property?

Federal laws defining the 1,000 foot exclusion zone around school zones specifically exempts private property.

Note: Once one leaves private property they may be subject to the 1,000 foot exclusion zone. This includes but not limited to; sidewalks, roads and other public property. Federal law indicates that when transiting school zones with firearms, the firearms should be; unloaded and in a locked container, or a locked firearms rack that is on a motor vehicle. Federal law indicates that if you have a state issued permit (that was issued after a police background check) from the state where the school zone resides then you are exempt from the 1,00s0 foot exclusion rule outside of the physical school grounds or property.

Are malls, sports arenas, sports stadiums, theaters and other such venues "gun free zones"?

Many if not all public "malls" such as Westfield malls prohibit firearms and other weapons on their property. There is typically a "code of conduct" mounted on walls at entrances in certain public malls. Many sports arenas, stadiums and other public venues also prohibit firearms and other weapons on their property. Many sports venues also have metal detectors, wands, or search baggage, of persons prior to entry.

Note: Some public venues will list prohibited items on their websites. Other public venues have signs on premises that prohibit firearms or weapons. It is advisable to check with the venue ahead of time to avoid any potential issues.

Can I carry in a public park, state park and forest or in a national park?

Check with the local public park prior to entering it. Some may prohibit weapons within public park premises. Firearms, except under certain narrow circumstances, are prohibited from state parks and forests. One exception is if a rifle range is location on state park or forest land. Unless otherwise prohibited, firearms are allowed at National Parks provided one follows all applicable state and or local laws.

Note: It is advisable to check with the organization that oversee's the park or forest prior to entry to avoid any potential issues. Certain National Monuments will have security checkpoints where people are screened and will prohibit and or confiscate firearms and other weapons.

 

 

 

Permit Information

Permit to Carry Pistol or Revolver

The permit to carry pistols and revolvers will allow a Connecticut resident to purchase handguns, long guns, ammunition and ammunition magazines. Generally one applies for a permit to carry pistols and revolvers with their local issuing authority. Generally the local issuing authority is one's local police department, if none exists then contact your town hall and inquire who is the contact person for pistol permit applications. You will be required to take a state approved safety course. Please note that occasionally one or more of the various fees to obtain this permit may change so review the permit documents carefully and ask questions to the local issuing authority if you have any questions. Expect to pay upwards of $200 or more (including safety course) to obtain the state pistol permit. Please see the following links for more information on pistol permits.

 

Special Licensing and Firearms - Connecticut State Pistol Permit

Special Licensing and Firearms - Firearms and Permit Related Forms and Information

 

The permit issuing process often leads to frustration and long wait times. While there are statutory timelines (eight weeks to approve or deny the permit application) often times the local issuing authorities will ignore, often intentionally, these timelines. For some cities like Bridgeport and New Haven it is routine to wait upwards of six months or longer before having one's application approved. Many local issuing authorities will require additional materials or actions from the applicant. Please note that the Board of Firearms Permit Examiners (BFPE) has ruled (see here) that a local issuing authority may not deny an application for failing to provide any extra materials the local issuing authority may require. It is generally recommended to file an appeal (see here) the second your local issuing authority goes past the eight week statutory time line. There are additional statutory timelines within the eight week approval or denial timeline.

 

Generally if one is not prohibited from obtaining a pistol permit one will be granted the temporary permit by the local issuing authority. Once one has the temporary permit in hand they can proceed immediately (the same day) to obtain the state issued permit from DESPP/SLFU at one of their locations that issues pistol permits. Once the state permit has been issued one can immediately purchase a handgun. Currently there is no limit (other than one's ability to pay) to how many handguns one can purchase at any one time.

 

If you have further questions on the permitting process, the extra requirements some towns mandate, or are having a problem please use this site's search feature. There are a number of threads dealing with permit related issues. For more serious permit issues such as denials or if one has past criminal history and is worried about being denied, it is recommended that you either contact a lawyer familiar with this state's permitting laws, or contact CTCarry.com.

 

See the following links for more information on pistol permit related issues and timelines.

 

CTCarry.com (click on the Permit menu link)

CCDL Permit Issues

 

Note: Some local issuing authorities are claiming that you have to have taken the hand gun safety course within the last year. Please note that there is NO expiration date to the handgun safety course (see here for more information).

 

Non Resident Permit to Carry Pistol or Revolver

Non residents can apply for the non resident permit which will allow them to carry a hand gun within the state of Connecticut. It generally takes about eight weeks for SLFU to process and issue the non resident permit. See the following link for more information.

 

Special Licensing and Firearms - Connecticut State Pistol Permit

 

Eligibility Certificate to Purchase a Pistol or Revolver

The eligibility certificate to purchase a pistol or revolver will allow a Connecticut resident to purchase hand guns, long guns, ammunition and ammunition magazines. Please note however that this certificate DOES NOT allow one to carry a hand gun in public. It only allows one to purchase a hand gun and then transport that hand gun to their home or business. Please see the following link for more information.

 

Special Licensing and Firearms - Eligibility Certificate

 

Eligibility Certificate to Purchase Long Guns

The eligibility certificate to purchase long guns will allow a Connecticut resident to purchase a long gun (rifle or shotgun), ammunition and ammunition magazines. Please see the following link for more information.

 

Special Licensing and Firearms - Firearms and Permit Related Forms and Information

 

Ammunition Certificate

The ammunition certificate to purchase ammunition and ammunition magazines will allow both Connecticut residents and non residents to purchase ammunition or ammunition magazines within this state. Please see the following link for more information.

 

Special Licensing and Firearms - Firearms and Permit Related Forms and Information

 

Note: Non residents seeking to purchase ammunition or ammunition magazines within this state must have one of the relevant permits or certificates to purchase ammunition or magazines. A non resident can obtain an ammunition certificate by containing SLFU (see here).

 

 

 

Miscellaneous Information

What or who constitutes the the military or naval forces of this state for the purposes of being able to buy a so called "assault weapon" or so called "large capacity magazine"?

The organized militia which consists of; the Governor's Guards, the State Guard and other military forces designated by the Governor. Along with the National Guard, the naval militia and marine corps branch of the naval militia, are for all purposes under the general statutes, the armed forces of the state.

What do the various permits and certificates look like?

Permit to Carry Pistol or Revolver Permit

Pistol Permit Sample

 

Eligibility Certificate to Purchase a Pistol or Revolver

Pistol Revolver Eligibility Certificate Sample

 

Eligibility Certificate to Purchase Long Guns

Eligibility Certificate to Purchase Long Gun Sample

 

Ammunition Certificate

Ammuntion Certificate Sample

What does "copies and duplicates" mean with respect to so called "assault weapons"?

SLFU has produced an order (per SLFU document number: 14-37) that is intended; to provide uniform procedures for interpretation and application of the "copy or duplicate" language within Connecticut General Statutes Section 53-202a. SLFU has indicated they; will apply a three-prong test in interpreting whether a firearm fits under the "copies or duplicates" language of the statute. This test will focus on the "action" of the firearm. The "action" is defined by C.G.S.§53-202a(3)as, "...the part of the firearm that loads, fires and ejects a cartridge, which part includes, but is not limited to, the upper and lower receiver, charging handle, forward assist, magazine release and shell deflector.. ." This three-prong test is similar in some respects to the previous three-prong test SLFU utilized for the "AK-47 Type" prior to 4/4/13.

 

SLFU has indicated that; if the answer to each of the following three questions is "yes" when comparing a firearm to one that is specifically named in C.G.S. §§53-202a(1)(B), 53-202a(1)(C) or 53¬202a(1)(D), the firearm shall fall under the "copies or duplicates" language of C.G.S. §53-202a:

 

  1. Physical Appearance: Does the "action" of the firearm look like that of a firearm specifically named in C.G.S. §§53-202a(1)(B), 53-202a(1)(C) or 53-202a(1)(D)?
  2. Functionality: Does the "action" of the firearm work like that of a firearm specifically named in C.G.S. §§53-202a(1)(B), 53-202a(1)(C) or 53-202a(1)(D)?
  3. Interchangeable Parts: Are the major components of the "action" (i.e., the bolt, the operating rod, the trigger and/or the sear) in its stock configuration interchangeable with that of a firearm specifically named in C.G.S. §§53-202a(1 )(B), 53-202a(1)(C) or 53-202a(1)(D)?

If the answer to all three of the above questions is "yes" and a certificate of possession has not been obtained for the firearm but is required (i.e., it is not a pre-ban firearm), the party in possession shall surrender the firearm or render it inoperable.

 

Note: The text italicized in the preceding few paragraphs/sentences were copied directly from the SLFU document number: 14-37. See this link for a copy of that SLFU document.

Can I buy body armor in CT?

Yes. However, the sale/transfer must be made face to face.

 

However the statute indicates the following are exempt from the face to face sale/transfer requirement; a sworn member or authorized official of an organized local police department, the Division of State Police within the Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection, the Division of Criminal Justice, the Department of Correction, the Board of Pardons and Paroles or the Department of Motor Vehicles, an authorized official of a municipality or the Department of Administrative Services that purchases body armor on behalf of an organized local police department, the Division of State Police within the Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection, the Division of Criminal Justice, the Department of Correction, the Board of Pardons and Paroles or the Department of Motor Vehicles, an authorized official of the Judicial Branch who purchases body armor on behalf of a probation officer or a judicial marshal, or a member of the National Guard or the armed forces

 

The statue indicates; “body armor” means any material designed to be worn on the body and to provide bullet penetration resistance.

 

Note: Certain individuals convicted of certain felonies and other offences are prohibited from possessing body armor. See this statute link for more information on who is prohibited from possessing body armor.

reserve.

Can I turn an 80% lower into an "AR-15"?

Unless the 80% lower has already been registered as a so called "assault weapon" (Certificate of Possession) with the state you cannot create a firearm from a post 9/13/94 manufactured 80% lower that would be considered a semiautomatic centerfire "AR-15" rifle or a copy or duplicate of a semiautomatic centerfire "AR-15" rifle. Please see the SLFU Copy or Duplicates document for more information on what constitutes a copy or duplicate of a banned by name firearm that the state considers a so called "assault weapon".

 

However, there are several ways one can create a rifle from an 80% lower that would not violate the "AR-15" copy or duplicate rifle ban.

  • Create a non semiautomatic rifle.
  • Create a rimfire rifle.
  • Modify the "action" of the firearm enough so that it skirts the copy or duplicate test SLFU has implemented.

Note: Once the firearm skirts the "AR-15" copy or duplicates ban one still has to contend with the single feature ban in order for the firearm to be legal in the state of Connecticut. Please see the following link for more information on the semiautomatic detachable magazine centerfire rife feature ban.

 

 

 

List of Statutes

Sec. 27-1. Persons subject to military duty.

Sec. 27-2. Classes of militia.

Sec. 29-28. Permit for sale at retail of pistol or revolver. Permit to carry pistol or revolver. Confidentiality of name and address of permit holder. Permits for out-of-state residents.

Sec. 29-33. Sale, delivery or transfer of pistols and revolvers. Procedure. Penalty.

Sec. 29-36f. Eligibility certificate for pistol or revolver.

Sec. 29-36g. Application for eligibility certificate. Criminal history records check. Deadline for approval or denial of application. Form of certificate. Change of address. Confidentiality of name and address of certificate holder. Scope of certificate.

Sec. 29-37a. Sale, delivery or transfer of long guns. Procedure. Penalty.

Sec. 29-37i. (Formerly Sec. 29-37c). Responsibilities re storage of loaded firearms.

Sec. 29-37p. Long gun eligibility certificate. Disqualifiers.

Sec. 29-37q. Long gun eligibility certificate. Application. Form and content. Confidentiality.

Sec. 29-37r. Long gun eligibility certificate. Fees. Expiration and renewal.

Sec. 29-38c. Seizure of firearms and ammunition from person posing risk of imminent personal injury to self or others.

Sec. 29-38d. Interstate transportation of firearms through state.

Sec. 29-38m. Sale of ammunition or ammunition magazine.

Sec. 29-38n. Ammunition certificate. Issuance. Form and content. Confidentiality.

Sec. 29-38o. Ammunition certificate. Fees. Expiration and renewal.

Sec. 53-202. Machine guns.

Old Law: Sec. 53-202a. Assault weapons: Definition.

Current Law: Sec. 53-202a. Assault weapons: Definitions.

Sec. 53-202b. Sale or transfer of assault weapon prohibited. Exemptions. Olympic pistols. Regulations. Class C felony.

Sec. 53-202c. Possession of assault weapon prohibited. Exemptions. Class D felony.

Sec. 53-202d. Certificate of possession of assault weapon. Certificate of transfer of assault weapon to gun dealer. Circumstances where possession of assault weapon authorized.

Sec. 53-202e. Relinquishment of assault weapon to law enforcement agency.

Sec. 53-202f. Transportation and transfer of assault weapon. Authorized actions of gun dealer, manufacturer, pawnbroker or consignment shop operator.

Sec. 53-202g. Report of loss or theft of assault weapon or other firearm. Penalty.

Sec. 53-202h. Temporary transfer or possession of assault weapon for transport to out-of-state event.

Sec. 53-202i. Circumstances in which manufacture, transportation or temporary transfer of assault weapons not prohibited.

Sec. 53-202l. Armor piercing and incendiary .50 caliber ammunition: Definition. Sale or transfer prohibited. Class D felony.

Sec. 53-202m. Circumstances when assault weapons exempt from limitations on transfers and registration requirements.

Sec. 53-202n. Possession of specified assault weapon permitted under certain circumstances. Notice requirement.

Sec. 53-202o. Affirmative defense in prosecution for possession of specified assault weapon.

Sec. 53-202w. Large capacity magazines. Definitions. Sale, transfer or possession prohibited. Exceptions.

Sec. 53-202x. Declaration of possession of large capacity magazine. Regulations.

Sec. 53-203. Unlawful discharge of firearms.

Sec. 53-204. Hunting or discharging firearm from public highway.

Sec. 53-205. Loaded shotguns, rifles and muzzleloaders prohibited in vehicles and snowmobiles.

Sec. 53-206. Carrying of dangerous weapons prohibited.

Sec. 53-206d. Carrying a firearm while under the influence of intoxicating liquor or drug prohibited. Hunting while under the influence of intoxicating liquor or drug or while impaired by the consumption of intoxicating liquor prohibited.

Sec. 53-341b. Sale or delivery of body armor restricted.

Sec. 53a-3. Definitions.

Sec. 53a-6. Effect of ignorance or mistake.

Sec. 53a-167a. Interfering with an officer: Class A misdemeanor or class D felony.

Sec. 53a-217b. Possession of a weapon on school grounds: Class D felony.

Sec. 53a-217d. Criminal possession of body armor: Class A misdemeanor.

Note: This is only a partial list of state statutes related to; so called "assault weapons", so called "large capacity magazines", ammunition, magaiznes, and statutes related to firearms in general. Please consult the following state of Connecticut websites for a full listing of the current statutes.

Current statutes: http://www.cga.ct.gov/2011/pub/chap504.htm
  http://www.cga.ct.gov/current/pub/chap_529.htm
  http://www.cga.ct.gov/current/pub/chap_943.htm
  http://www.cga.ct.gov/current/pub/chap_950.htm
  http://www.cga.ct.gov/current/pub/chap_952.htm

 

 

 

List of DESPP Forms/Applications/Publications/Websites

 

List of Opinions from DESPP/OLR

DESPP: Pre-Ban Assault Weapons

Former DESPP Commissioner: Pre-Ban Assault Weapons

DESPP: Law Enforcement Officers FAQS

Office of Legislative Research: Pre-1994 Assault Weapons - 2013-R-0453

 

 

 

Other Relevant Links

 

Disclaimer

This information does not constitute a legal opinion; it is presented for informational purposes only. The authors, CTGunTalk.com, and any other party involved in creating, producing or delivering this document assume no liability or responsibility for any errors or omissions contained within this document. All information is provided "AS IS". The reader assumes any and all liability and responsibility when acting on the information contained within this document. The reader assumes any all liability and responsibility to understand and follow any and all applicable laws of the State of Connecticut and any and all applicable Federal laws.

 

 

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